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Kindergarten Readiness » Fine Motor and Visual Motor Activities
Fine Motor and Visual Motor Activities Fine Motor and Visual Motor Activities

Fine Motor and Visual Motor Development Actvities:

Body Stability -The joints of the body need to be stable before the hands can be free to focus on specific skilled fine motor tasks.

  • Wheelbarrow walking, crab walking, and wall push-ups.
  • Toys: Orbiter, silly putty, and monkey bars on the playground.

When a certain amount of body stability hasdeveloped, the hands and fingers begin to work on movements of dexterity and isolationas well as different kinds of grasps. Children will develop fine motor skills best when they work on a VERTICAL or near vertical surface as much as possible. In particular, the wrist must be in extension. (Bent back in the direction of the hand)

Attach a large piece of drawing paper to the wall. Have the child use a large marker and try the following exercises to develop visual motor skills:

  • Make an outline of a hand one at a time. Have the child trace over your line from left to right, or from top to bottom.
  • Trace each figure at least 10 times .
  • Play connect the dots. Again make sure the child's strokes connect dots from left to right, and from top to bottom.
  • Trace around stencils - the non-dominant hand should hold the stencil flat and stable against the paper, while the dominant hand pushes the pencil firmly against the edge of the stencil. The stencil must be held firmly.
  • Attach a large piece of felt to the wall, or use a felt board. The child can use felt shapes to make pictures. Magnetic boards can be used the same way.
  • Have the child work on a chalkboard, using chalk instead of a marker.
  • Do the same kinds of tracing and modeling activities as suggested above. Paint at an easel. Some of the modeling activities as suggested above can be done at the easel.
  • Magna Doodle- turn it upside down so that the erasing lever is on the top. Experiment making vertical, horizontal, and parallel lines.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





Mrs. Susan Anderson
New Haven Elementary Kindergarten
10854 US Highway 42
Union, KY 41091
859-384-5325